nick js thompson

Faded Glory – Two Person Show in San Francisco

Faded Glory – With Nick JS Thompson

Faded Glory - Benjamin Murphy & Nick JS Thompson

Faded Glory install shots

My most recent show was a two-person show with my friend and long-time collaborator Nick JS Thompson. For FADED GLORY, we decided to approach the show with a strong curatorial vision, hanging the heterogenous works experimentally, so as to combine Nick’s photography with my paintings. The show opened at Book & Job gallery in San Francisco on the 7th of February in the Tenderloin District of San Francisco.

We made the decision early on to both work in black and white and only on paper. We also decided to focus on interiors, with a strong pattern-based approach – many of the work featured plants and fabric patterns, but with no figures.

As well as this, we decided not to frame any of the works, and to affix them directly to the walls of the gallery, so that there would be as few constraints as possible in terms of combining works, and allowing them to disrupt one another. We wanted the effect to be one that is somewhat jarring, as if the works fit together, but only by altering each other quite aggressively. We made the works with the other in mind, but we didn’t make them together, and we didn’t plan how they wee going to interact when we were making them.

Faded Glory - Benjamin Murphy & Nick JS Thompson

Faded Glory install shots

Face Value 3

Overall, I very much enjoyed the process of allowing my works to be so drastically altered, but perhaps only because I trusted the person doing the alterations. I am taking part in another show in April entitled Face Value 3, which is curated by Mizog Art’s founder Gary Mansfield. (I was recently interviewed on the Mizog Art podcast, which you can listen to HERE). In this show, which is in aid of the Katie Piper Foundation, I will be donating a work which will be altered by another artist, as well as altering a piece by Jessica Albarn. This show opens on the 18th of April at Jealous Gallery.

 

For more photos of exhibitions I’ve had recently, check out my show Trinity at The Saatchi Gallery, which is still up.

Obscurely Prophetic Exhibition

I’m about to launch a a new roving gallery in East London and I’m very excited about it. We (Delphian Gallery) have been curating exhibitions for the past 4 years, but are about to relaunch with our first show in partnership with theprintspace in Hoxton. More information can be found on the Facebook page HERE
And you can RSVP for the private view HERE 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Drinks have been kindly supplied by Camden Town Brewery, so big thanks to them. 

 

 

 

Studio Documentary

Here is the new film documenting myself at work in the studio. It offers a rare insight into the way that I create works using electrical tape, and my inspirations and reasons for doing so.

Produced and Directed by the immensely talented Nick JS Thompson
Originally released at Moniker Art Fair with Stick Together
Bespoke music by James Dory Sutherland

Decline of Conscience

nick_js_thompson_06-DoCwebRooms Magazine asked me to curate a show with them, the first in their series of many. I chose the photographer (and good friend of mine) Nick JS Thompson, and his series of works documenting the dereliction and destruction of the Brutalist housing project The Heygate Estate in South London.

The show opens this Thursday at Hundred Years Gallery in Hoxton.

Event details at the below link:

https://www.facebook.com/events/113997528959797/

The estate, left empty for 7 years after the 3,000 residents were “decanted” is now being regenerated although only 3% of the new homes will be available for social renting. This disparity in planned housing echoes what is happening across much of London.

The Brutalist architecture of the Heygate, which was completed in 1974, was hailed as a new modern style of living. This perception changed over time and towards the end of the Estate’s life it became renowned for crime, and dilapidation. The residents of Heygate have been rehomed due to this new construction project, which adds to the increasing gentrification of the area.

Many architects, planners and professionals have analysed the site over the years and many came to the conclusion that it could easily be regenerated (for less than demolishing and starting again)using the existing, structurally sound buildings. One previous estimate of what it would cost to refurbish the Heygate Estate to a modern standard was £35m. The cost of evicting the residents for Southwark Council was £65.5m and the site was sold for £55m but Lend Lease (the developers) are expected to make a profit of £195m from the sale of new flats.

The Heygate Estate’s fate differs greatly from the fortunes of other Brutalist housing projects such as The Barbican or Trellick Tower, which have both been awarded Grade II listing status.

 

Hope to see you there!

 

Benjamin Murphy