exhibition

Faded Glory – Two Person Show in San Francisco

Faded Glory – With Nick JS Thompson

Faded Glory - Benjamin Murphy & Nick JS Thompson

Faded Glory install shots

My most recent show was a two-person show with my friend and long-time collaborator Nick JS Thompson. For FADED GLORY, we decided to approach the show with a strong curatorial vision, hanging the heterogenous works experimentally, so as to combine Nick’s photography with my paintings. The show opened at Book & Job gallery in San Francisco on the 7th of February in the Tenderloin District of San Francisco.

We made the decision early on to both work in black and white and only on paper. We also decided to focus on interiors, with a strong pattern-based approach – many of the work featured plants and fabric patterns, but with no figures.

As well as this, we decided not to frame any of the works, and to affix them directly to the walls of the gallery, so that there would be as few constraints as possible in terms of combining works, and allowing them to disrupt one another. We wanted the effect to be one that is somewhat jarring, as if the works fit together, but only by altering each other quite aggressively. We made the works with the other in mind, but we didn’t make them together, and we didn’t plan how they wee going to interact when we were making them.

Faded Glory - Benjamin Murphy & Nick JS Thompson

Faded Glory install shots

Face Value 3

Overall, I very much enjoyed the process of allowing my works to be so drastically altered, but perhaps only because I trusted the person doing the alterations. I am taking part in another show in April entitled Face Value 3, which is curated by Mizog Art’s founder Gary Mansfield. (I was recently interviewed on the Mizog Art podcast, which you can listen to HERE). In this show, which is in aid of the Katie Piper Foundation, I will be donating a work which will be altered by another artist, as well as altering a piece by Jessica Albarn. This show opens on the 18th of April at Jealous Gallery.

 

For more photos of exhibitions I’ve had recently, check out my show Trinity at The Saatchi Gallery, which is still up.

Install Shots of my show Trinity at the Saatchi Gallery

Here are some install shots of my recent show Trinity at The Saatchi Gallery. This was a really great experience for me, as it was the first time I’ve ever completely covered with tape the entirety of the walls that my work is presented on. As well as that, it’s the Saatchi, which is always a great place to show. 

install shots
This was also only the second time I’ve exhibited sculpture alongside my tape paintings. One of these was a collaboration with Wilma Vaisanen. 

Install shots

After the show finished, The Saatchi Gallery decided to extend part of my show, so the sold works were sent off to their respective new owners, and the others were rehung on the smaller of my two walls, which they can still be viewed on now.

 

To see more of the individual works in the show, please go HERE

To see the remaining available works, please go HERE

Mizog Art Podcast

I was very happy to have been invited by Gary Mansfield to guest on the Mizog Art podcast. My episode has just been released, so have a listen if you want to hear me waffle on about art for an hour.

Mizog art podcast

Mizog Art

During our conversation, we discuss such themes as:

Delphian Gallery, and why myself and Nick JS Thompson decided to start a gallery; My shows at The Saatchi Gallery, Mine and Nick’s show at Book & Job Gallery in California, the Stamford Prison Experiment, Marina Abramovic, Jeremy Deller, and lots of other art and non-art related things.

If you’d like to check it out, you can do so

[HERE]

Please SHARE it like crazy, and let me know what you think.

xx

Highlights and Thanks for 2018

2018 was a massive year for me, I’ve been incredibly lucky to have been involved in some amazing projects, so I thought I’d compile a little list of highlights and thanks. It was a VERY busy year, and as such there is a lot to cover; inevitably I am going to miss some stuff accidentally, and if I do miss you our I’m sorry, I’ll update the list as and when. That’s also the reason I am so late to the party in posting this.

 

  • One of the biggest highlights of the year was my solo show Lavish Entropy with Delphian Gallery in the summer, which was a lot of fun being able to host my own show at my gallery – possibly the biggest thanks of all to my business partner Nick JS Thompson.
Highlights - lavish-entropy-benjamin-murphy7W

Lavish Entropy at Delphian Gallery

  • I have been hired as an associate lecturer at University of the Arts London, which I’m super happy about. I have a deep love of learning (I wish I did whilst I was actually at uni though), and I love being in such a buzzing hub of creativity – thanks to my new boss Charley Peters for this.
  • I have exhibited at The Saatchi Gallery three times this year, the latter of the three shows being one in which I had a lot of wall space to myself to do what I like with, and so felt like a mini solo show. Thanks to all at the Saatchi for this.

 

  • At my solo show, I also released my first play Flowering Desolation, which is written entirely using single sentences harvested from over 80 sources of classic literature. It is available to download for free HERE. Thanks to Kenton Thomas for all your help with formatting it, and being the first to read it and give me feedback.
  • For my solo show catalogue I asked one of my all time favourite artists Andrew Salgado to write a little something. I was blown away by the response, which was a 1000 word essay, and summed me up better than I ever could have done myself.
  • The gallery I co-own Delphian Gallery has really taken off, and I’m super happy to have been included in such a great project. We launched a little over a year ago, and am already exhibiting some of my favourite contemporary artists. These include solo shows with Jordy Kerwick, Florence Hutchings, and Carson Lancaster – HUGE thanks to them.
  • Also a big thanks to Stuart Waplington and all at theprintspace for allowing us to do some shows in their space, and helping out with everything.
  • The Delphian Open Call was incredible, receiving over 8,000 submissions which was CRAZY. The overall winner was Florence Hutchings, and the other winners included Igor Moritz, Geoffrey Bohm, Jonathan Edelhuber, Bertrand Fournier, Ellie Geary, Philip Gerald, Rosie Gilligan, Klaus Is Coming, and loads more – thank you all.

 

 

I have a really exciting 2019 planned, which involves.

  • Writing my first book (!)
  • At Delphian Gallery we are hosting a two person show with Kevin Perkins and Igor Moritz, and the debut UK solo show of Bertrand Fournier. As well as these, we’re launching our second annual Open Call.
  • A two-person show with myself and Nick JS Thompson at Book & Job gallery in San Fransisco.
  • I also plan to make more sculpture and some more oil paintings in 2019, and start showing them.

Slow Fiasco – New print *Update – now SOLD OUT*

I’m very excited to have just released my newest linoprint Slow Fiasco.

It’s an A3 hand drawn, cut, and printed linoprint on the highest-quality Fabriano Rosaspina Bianco paper. This is a test print for a new technique of printing multiple layers onto the same paper. This is the first time I have done this technique.

Slow Fiasco

Slow Fiasco Linoprint

The lace veil, as well as the plants in the vase, and the plants coming in from the right, are all a separate layer of lino that is printed on top of the first layer.

It’s a run of only 15 prints so I’m expecting them to go fast.

Slow Fiasco

Slow Fiasco Detail

To purchase, please follow THIS LINK

 

Also, today is Sylvia Plath’s birthday, so here is an old print I did in homage to her a few years ago.

Hanging Experiments

I have recently been playing around with new ways to hang works, by mixing up how I play around with the tape in the frame and the tape on the wall. Below is my most recent of the hanging experiments, in which I have draw a flat pattern onto a wall as if it is wallpaper, and then hung the framed works on top of it.

hanging experiments

Semi-Skimmed Gallery (September 2018)

Other hanging experiments can be seen in these posts from my solo show at Beers Contemporary in January 2016, and this other drawing I did on the walls of the Tate Modern in December of 2016.

Before I have either continued the drawings onto the walls, beyond the confines of their frames, or made original drawings onto the walls themselves. I am experimenting now with paring this all back, and taping only flat patterns on which to hang the works.

hanging experiments

Delphian Gallery (July 2018)

I think this is a much more successful way of displaying the works than the ways I have done it in the past, and I look forward to playing around with it more in my upcoming shows.

Below are two of the works hung over the pattern in the first photo (both now sold).

hanging experiment

Ink on paper, in hand-carved solid birch frame

hanging experiment

electrical tape on single microscope slide

Jealous Needs You and 30X30 at the Saatchi Gallery

JEALOUS NEEDS YOU

I was recently invited to take part in the annual JNY project, in which 30 artists each released a print which was printed by Jealous Gallery. Each was an edition of 36, and mine was a three-layer screen print of one of my most popular works to date, Ophelia. The original was inspired by the character of the same name from William Shakespeare’s Hamlet, and is an A4 black electrical tape painting on glass, which I then encased in resin and framed. It was shown at my fifth solo show Lavish Entropy with Delphian Gallery in July.

I absolutely LOVE how they printed these, with a subtle grey layer to delineate the shadows under where the tape is on the original, and a gloss white layer on the flowers. I was very happy to have been invited to take part in this project again, as I had such great feedback about my print from the project a few years ago.

Jealous benjamin murphy saatchi

SAATCHI GALLERY

After shows in both Jealous galleries, these prints went on to be exhibited for a whole month at The Saatchi Gallery, in their Prints & Originals room. It was incredible to show at the Saatchi again, as it’s one of my favourite London Galleries. They also shared my piece on their Instagram account and in their mailinglist, which was flattering.

PRINTS

I have held back a batch of these prints and will be making them available for sale just before Christmas. Email info@benjaminmurphy.info to add yourself to the waiting list if you would like one.

 

Big thanks to Dario, Louise, Nick, as well as Paul at The Saatchi for making this happen again. 

Lavish Entropy Photos

I have just realised that I never posted photos of my last solo show Lavish Entropy with Delphian Gallery, so here they are below.

I’d like to take this opportunity to thank my fellow Delphian Gallery team for everything. Andrew Salgado for writing the amazing catalogue text. Old Blue Last Beer for supplying the drinks for the opening party. And everyone else who visited, bought works, or blogged about the show.

lavish entropy benjamin murphy lavish entropy benjamin murphy

 

Arrested Motion interview.

I was recently interviewed by Arrested Motion about Delphian Gallery, and a few of our recent shows. Check the full thing out below.

Art historian Hector Campbell recently sat down with artist and co-founder of Delphian Gallery, Benjamin Murphy, to discuss the history of the gallery, his own unique approach to curation, their inaugural Open Call exhibition, and their upcoming exhibition with Florence Hutchings, Seating Arrangement.

Hector Campbell (HC): Delphian Gallery has existed in one manifestation or another since 2013’s ‘Group Collective are Kunsts’ exhibition, could you explain how the gallery first came about? And how it has subsequently evolved into its current model?

Benjamin Murphy (BM): My co-director (photographer Nick JS Thompson) and I have been working together for a number of years after we met when he wrote an article about me in a magazine he used to manage. I went on to write for the magazine, and we both started co-curating one another’s shows. We both developed a deep love of, and interest in, the art of curation, and so decided to curate our first show in my old studio. It has been a real labour of love for us, which has built gradually into what Delphian is now – a peripatetic style gallery that takes the championing of exciting, emerging art as its key aim.

HC: Delphian, meaning ‘Obscurely Prophetic,’ derives from the Greek mythological oracle at Delphi. What was the rationale behind choosing ‘Delphian’, and how does it’s meaning underpin the gallery’s vision?

BM: Well firstly, we wanted something that was Googleable, as well as something less vapid than just both of our surnames. We decided upon Delphian because it is vague enough to not be too constrictive in what we can show, as well as being something with its own character. “Obscurely Prophetic” is, in a concise two-word phrase, one which we believe all the best art accomplishes. We believe that the most successful and thought-provoking work is informative, but in a non-didactic way.

HC: As an artist-run gallery, what advantages or insights does this offer you, as opposed to more traditional gallerist or art dealers?

BM: I think we understand the position of the artist more than a lot of gallerists or curators do, as we are both artists in our own right. This gives us a unique insight into both sides of the coin in terms of how a show is put together and run, from the artwork production point, up until the curation of a show and the sale of an artwork.

As well as this, we try to curate cohesive shows that could be read as a single artwork in their own right. The way we curate is quite experimental, as we believe there is nothing less interesting (or damaging to the artworks themselves), as a show in which all of the artworks are hung at eye-level around the gallery. These types of shows often encourage people to stand in the middle of the room and just rotate themselves 360 degrees, they leave feeling like they have seen all of the artworks – when of course they often haven’t. We want to curate shows that are essentially immersive artworks in themselves, that are ethereal and only exist in the moment, until the heterogeneous works are divided up again and are either sold or sent back to the artists. We believe that curation is an art form in itself, and it is this philosophy which guides how we curate.

HC: Previous exhibitions have included photographers Aaron McElroy and Carson Lancaster, and more recently contemporary painters such as Bertrand Fournier and Kevin Perkins. Does this range of artists and mediums reflect your personal interests? And how do you select which artists to exhibit?

BM: We try to show a diverse range of works that are entirely unique, whilst highlighting possible underlying connections or similarities, as well as playing with ways in which differing styles contrast. We spend a lot of time going to shows, as well as countless hours on social media, scrolling through things like Instagram looking for new talent. We also run a separate Instagram account called @Daily_Contemporary_Art, which is great for discovering new artists. Every week a new artist has control of the account and shares their favourite living artists, and we find that it is often the student artists that share the most exciting work.

HC: You also had your most recent solo exhibition, Lavish Entropy, at the gallery earlier this year. How did this experience compare to your previous shows, acting as not only the artist but also the gallerist/curator?

BM: It was great, I often take a quite hands-on approach to the curation of my own shows anyway (often aided by Nick), so in that sense, this was no different. I’d recommend every artist do this at least once in your career, as when you have full creative control over something you can be as wild and as experimental as you like without anyone trying to curtail your vision. Don’t get me wrong – the curatorial teams at galleries are often incredibly helpful and teach me things about my own work that I wouldn’t have realised otherwise, but it can be incredibly freeing having absolutely no constraints sometimes. This kind of thing is great, and you are able to take bigger risks than usual, and this teaches you what does and doesn’t work in a way that you wouldn’t have been able to see without this freedom.

HC: This year the gallery ran your inaugural Open Call submission exhibition, why did you want to undertake this competition? And what did you learn from this first iteration?

BM: It was so great, and through it we discovered so much great art we wouldn’t have done if it weren’t for the open call. We wanted to make it as easy as possible to submit, so as to get the most submissions possible. We didn’t charge for entry, and our good friends at theprintspace printed and mounted it all for us, so there was no cost to the artists. This also meant that, as the artists only had to send us a jpeg, artists from all over the world could submit and not have to worry about shipping or insuring their work. We received over 8000 submissions in total and were awestruck by the diversity of it. There are many artists who we would have loved to have included but couldn’t because of size and space constraints. As well as Florence Hutchings, another of our favourite artists Bertrand Fournier entered, whom we hope to present a solo show with next year.

HC: For your latest exhibition, Florence Hutchings, who won the aforementioned Open Call competition, presents her debut solo show, Seating Arrangements. How important is it for you to champion young artists such as Florence?

florence hutchings - delphian gallery (arrested Motion)

Florence Hutchings – Secular Throne

BM: Florence is great, she has done so incredibly well at such a young age and yet still doesn’t really seem phased by it all. She is very down-to-earth, which is nice to see from someone who is already reaching levels of success that most artists can only dream of.

We aim to discover and support young, emerging artists because we feel this is where the most exciting and unique work is coming from. We are in a position to be able to help out the careers of these young artists like people did for us when we first started showing, so it is incredibly rewarding in that respect.

We get to nurture this often raw and unbridled talent early on in an artist’s career, and look forward to the time when artists like Florence outgrow us and sign with Gagosian – for it will happen, especially in her case.

To see the whole thing on Arrested Motion, click this LINK.

Cash Is King at the Saatchi Gallery.

cash is king - benjamin murphy - saatchi gallery cash is king - benjamin murphy - saatchi gallery cash is king - benjamin murphy - saatchi gallery

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My second exhibition of the year at The Saatchi Gallery was the Cash Is King show, in which all of the artists drew on to existing currency. the show finished at the end of September, and I will be back there for another show in early December.

My last show was as part of Jealous Needs You, which was the one directly before this one.

Benjamin Murphy