electrical tape

Hanging Experiments

I have recently been playing around with new ways to hang works, by mixing up how I play around with the tape in the frame and the tape on the wall. Below is my most recent of the hanging experiments, in which I have draw a flat pattern onto a wall as if it is wallpaper, and then hung the framed works on top of it.

hanging experiments

Semi-Skimmed Gallery (September 2018)

Other hanging experiments can be seen in these posts from my solo show at Beers Contemporary in January 2016, and this other drawing I did on the walls of the Tate Modern in December of 2016.

Before I have either continued the drawings onto the walls, beyond the confines of their frames, or made original drawings onto the walls themselves. I am experimenting now with paring this all back, and taping only flat patterns on which to hang the works.

hanging experiments

Delphian Gallery (July 2018)

I think this is a much more successful way of displaying the works than the ways I have done it in the past, and I look forward to playing around with it more in my upcoming shows.

Below are two of the works hung over the pattern in the first photo (both now sold).

hanging experiment

Ink on paper, in hand-carved solid birch frame

hanging experiment

electrical tape on single microscope slide

Art Masterclass at West London Art Factory

benjamin murphy masterclass

Masterclass flyer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On the 18th of October I will be doing this masterclass at West London Art Factory, I rarely do this kind of thing (in fact this is the first one open to the public that I have ever done), so if you’d like to attend please get tickets via the link at the bottom of the page.

I will begin with a short talk, and then will take you through the process of how I make my works, by showing and explaining, and then you will be free to create your own. I will be around to mentor you as you create the works, and all materials will be provided, as well as refreshments.

Masterclass Info

West London Art Factory invites you to spend an evening with accredited artist Benjamin Murphy, learning to create your own artwork using electrical tape alone. This unique medium is one that makes Benjamin’s work instantly recognisable, as well as its monochromatic themes and figurative subjects. The masterclass offers you an opportunity to watch Benjamin’s process of creating his work and learn these techniques first hand, working with Benjamin to create your own unique piece. The class will begin with a welcome, followed by a demonstration by Benjamin then an opportunity for you to create your own work, guided by Benjamin, using a number of colours and tapes available, on an A3 perspex sheet. The result will be an original piece of art for you to take home. No prior experience is needed, all levels are welcome and all material is provided. Drinks and refreshments will be available.

Please note, this class has limited spaces so be sure to secure your place!!

During the workshop, you’ll learn to make works like these.

[TICKETS]

[FACEBOOK]

This event is graciously sponsored by Cre8 Tapes and Jewel Goodby Contemporary

Andrew Salgado Text

I recently asked one of my favourite artists (+friend, collaborator, inspiration) Andrew Salgado to write a short text about my work to include in the catalogue for my upcoming solo show. As is always the case with Salgado, he went above and beyond expectations. I was expecting a few sentences at most, and so was completely dumbfounded by what I got back. I think it’s safe to say he understands both me, and my work, better than I do. So if you would like a great insight into my work have a little read of what he wrote, which I have pasted below. I love it so much.

Huge thanks to Salgado – go and buy his work from Beers Contemporary HERE!

 

Benjamin Murphy is a Romantic – he strolls in wearing all black, of slight stature, looking appropriately broody with skeleton rings on each finger that he’s made himself and decked out in stylized tattoos – most of which he’s designed (and also probably executed upon) himself. He’s the embodiment of his own work; where art-meets-life-meets-art; probably a Kafka novel somewhere in his bag and a journal full of sketches and notes. He’s a bit like I imagine the old Romantic poets, literal manifestations of the very subjects of their poetry – the artist, in beautiful torment, unable to function properly as the very obsess to create somehow overwhelms them. A quick Google search reveals the tenets of Romanticism – the tenets I have long forgotten from my own time in art school – and they reveal themselves like a checklist of Murphy’s work: belief in the individual; reverence of nature; interest in the supernatural or gothic; interest in the past; nostalgic world-view. All of these, I would argue, form the foundations of Murphy’s work. 

 

Over the course of the past few years, Murphy’s artistic practice (well, truthfully it has become something of an oeuvre, hasn’t it?) has grown to encompass his trademark ‘black-electrical-tape’ drawings; traditional pen-and-ink drawing; stitching (by hand, laborious and pain-staking); painting; prose; poetry; and even playwriting. I’m sure he also must play a musical instrument or two, and probably has a number of other tricks up his sleeve, like the ‘five finger knife game’ (aka stabscotch) and must be brewing a bathtub full of gin somewhere. But the point is, this is a multifaceted talent who choses to focus his art on an aesthetic and ethos that is so well-rounded and thought-out that many artists working a lifetime would be jealous of. While his work has grown in terms of technique – which was already rather exceptional a few years back – what one sees now is an artist fully realizing his creative potential. There is never a summit for him, and I often talk to Murphy (well, Ben, to me when we aren’t being professional) and while I’m watching Come Dine with Me after a day in studio, he’s already done 8 hours of tape-drawings and has since been underlining prose in Baudelaire or Camus. What this obsession with work has created is now visually represented in these impeccably and profoundly executed tape-drawings: it is most evident in the triple-tier glass works, where ghostly shadows from layers of intricately detailed surfaces bounce and reflect upon each other. One work, Ghost (2018), depicts an undressing female before a slew of Modernist paintings – and lace curtains draping before a patterned floor, another pattern here, the fronds of a Monstera plant in the back. If you consider the actual work and intensity of mark-making, it’s astounding. When we remind ourselves that this work is executed in tape, not pen-and-ink, it is simply a gobsmacking display of talent. But again, I reiterate the idea that this sort of exhibition comes after years of practice – of obsessive focus on one thing, and the elaboration of a technique he has basically trademarked as his own. 

 

Like many works in the exhibition, the aforementioned piece is characteristic of a Murphy work but also characteristic of the tenets of Romanticism: firstly, imagine Murphy at work, and thus we have the solitary pursuit of an artist, working to depict the solitary moment of a character, usually in a decadently overgrown Victorian setting, usually depicted as a memento-mori or vanitas*, viewed upon in her private moments with a type of gentle reverie. There’s a subtle nod to Degas, with the undressing solitary beauties; but also Matisse, when he’s looking at interiors or plants or even patterns; and even a slight nod to punk-rock, Shakespeare, or even Tarantino: knifes, feathers, needles, that sort of thing. But what I love about Murphy’s work is its inherent sweetness; given its unflinching monochromatism and his love of Nihilist literature, I think the easy route would be to slip into cynicism. But there’s such an adoration of his own craft and the sensuous care of his own materiality that the work carries with it an inherent delicacy, a kind of grace wound into its very make-up, like a type of macabre but beautiful poetry in itself. 

   

I look forward to the day we can sit in a theatre, watching Murphy’s debut play upon stage, with the set-design that he’s created, all scored to music he wrote. It will be an atmospheric, theatrically sombre event, dimly lit, set to candle light. A bit of a Cabinet of Doctor Caligari vibe, I’m sure. So while the lights are on, spend some time with these works, consider the patience and care it would take to execute even just a small one. With those thin carefully delineated lines marking each individual strand of hair, or the articulated stigma of a flower, or the undulations of lace. Just as the Romantic finds himself lost in his own rapturous creation, these are marks that describe countless hours of obsession, and as this young career continues to evolve, one can only imagine how its varying facets will continue to intermingle into a further fully-realised beast. 

 

 

*A vanitas is a symbolic work of art showing the transience of life, the futility of pleasure, and the certainty of death, often contrasting symbols of wealth and symbols of ephemerality and death. Wikipedia

 

Lavish Entropy opens on Tuesday the 10th of July at Delphian Gallery – 67 York Street London W1H 1QB

More info HERE

London Loop Art Prize – Judging

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’m very happy to announce that I’ve been invited to judge this year’s London Loop art prize. 

The other judges include Turner Prize winner Joe Halligan (as part of Assemble), singer Aluna George, and Lee Bofkin. Prizes include a trip to NYC and £10k for the overall winner, so I hope you all got your entries in!

I’ll be uploading photos of the awards party to my Instagram so make sure to follow me there – @benjaminmuphy_

Hamartia – New print released

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My first full-sized lino print since 2015 is now available!

 

HAMARTIA

A2 linopint (hand drawn, cut, and printed)

Torn-edged Fabriano Rosaspina Bianco paper.

Edition of 17.

Follow the Prints link at the top of this page to purchase, or email INFO@BENJAMINMURPHY.INFO

 

The name Hamartia is often used to describe the error of judgement of a protagonist in literature. This piece in particular is loosely inspired by Desdemona’s final scene in William Shakespeare’s Othello, and the title refers to Othello’s realisation of his error of judgement (or anagnorisis).

 

Today (the 7th of March) happens to be my 30th birthday, so I decided to mark the occasion with a new print, which was drawn and cut over the Christmas period in Yorkshire, and printed in January in London.

Benjamin Murphy