beers contemporary

Hanging Experiments

I have recently been playing around with new ways to hang works, by mixing up how I play around with the tape in the frame and the tape on the wall. Below is my most recent of the hanging experiments, in which I have draw a flat pattern onto a wall as if it is wallpaper, and then hung the framed works on top of it.

hanging experiments

Semi-Skimmed Gallery (September 2018)

Other hanging experiments can be seen in these posts from my solo show at Beers Contemporary in January 2016, and this other drawing I did on the walls of the Tate Modern in December of 2016.

Before I have either continued the drawings onto the walls, beyond the confines of their frames, or made original drawings onto the walls themselves. I am experimenting now with paring this all back, and taping only flat patterns on which to hang the works.

hanging experiments

Delphian Gallery (July 2018)

I think this is a much more successful way of displaying the works than the ways I have done it in the past, and I look forward to playing around with it more in my upcoming shows.

Below are two of the works hung over the pattern in the first photo (both now sold).

hanging experiment

Ink on paper, in hand-carved solid birch frame

hanging experiment

electrical tape on single microscope slide

Andrew Salgado Text

I recently asked one of my favourite artists (+friend, collaborator, inspiration) Andrew Salgado to write a short text about my work to include in the catalogue for my upcoming solo show. As is always the case with Salgado, he went above and beyond expectations. I was expecting a few sentences at most, and so was completely dumbfounded by what I got back. I think it’s safe to say he understands both me, and my work, better than I do. So if you would like a great insight into my work have a little read of what he wrote, which I have pasted below. I love it so much.

Huge thanks to Salgado – go and buy his work from Beers Contemporary HERE!

 

Benjamin Murphy is a Romantic – he strolls in wearing all black, of slight stature, looking appropriately broody with skeleton rings on each finger that he’s made himself and decked out in stylized tattoos – most of which he’s designed (and also probably executed upon) himself. He’s the embodiment of his own work; where art-meets-life-meets-art; probably a Kafka novel somewhere in his bag and a journal full of sketches and notes. He’s a bit like I imagine the old Romantic poets, literal manifestations of the very subjects of their poetry – the artist, in beautiful torment, unable to function properly as the very obsess to create somehow overwhelms them. A quick Google search reveals the tenets of Romanticism – the tenets I have long forgotten from my own time in art school – and they reveal themselves like a checklist of Murphy’s work: belief in the individual; reverence of nature; interest in the supernatural or gothic; interest in the past; nostalgic world-view. All of these, I would argue, form the foundations of Murphy’s work. 

 

Over the course of the past few years, Murphy’s artistic practice (well, truthfully it has become something of an oeuvre, hasn’t it?) has grown to encompass his trademark ‘black-electrical-tape’ drawings; traditional pen-and-ink drawing; stitching (by hand, laborious and pain-staking); painting; prose; poetry; and even playwriting. I’m sure he also must play a musical instrument or two, and probably has a number of other tricks up his sleeve, like the ‘five finger knife game’ (aka stabscotch) and must be brewing a bathtub full of gin somewhere. But the point is, this is a multifaceted talent who choses to focus his art on an aesthetic and ethos that is so well-rounded and thought-out that many artists working a lifetime would be jealous of. While his work has grown in terms of technique – which was already rather exceptional a few years back – what one sees now is an artist fully realizing his creative potential. There is never a summit for him, and I often talk to Murphy (well, Ben, to me when we aren’t being professional) and while I’m watching Come Dine with Me after a day in studio, he’s already done 8 hours of tape-drawings and has since been underlining prose in Baudelaire or Camus. What this obsession with work has created is now visually represented in these impeccably and profoundly executed tape-drawings: it is most evident in the triple-tier glass works, where ghostly shadows from layers of intricately detailed surfaces bounce and reflect upon each other. One work, Ghost (2018), depicts an undressing female before a slew of Modernist paintings – and lace curtains draping before a patterned floor, another pattern here, the fronds of a Monstera plant in the back. If you consider the actual work and intensity of mark-making, it’s astounding. When we remind ourselves that this work is executed in tape, not pen-and-ink, it is simply a gobsmacking display of talent. But again, I reiterate the idea that this sort of exhibition comes after years of practice – of obsessive focus on one thing, and the elaboration of a technique he has basically trademarked as his own. 

 

Like many works in the exhibition, the aforementioned piece is characteristic of a Murphy work but also characteristic of the tenets of Romanticism: firstly, imagine Murphy at work, and thus we have the solitary pursuit of an artist, working to depict the solitary moment of a character, usually in a decadently overgrown Victorian setting, usually depicted as a memento-mori or vanitas*, viewed upon in her private moments with a type of gentle reverie. There’s a subtle nod to Degas, with the undressing solitary beauties; but also Matisse, when he’s looking at interiors or plants or even patterns; and even a slight nod to punk-rock, Shakespeare, or even Tarantino: knifes, feathers, needles, that sort of thing. But what I love about Murphy’s work is its inherent sweetness; given its unflinching monochromatism and his love of Nihilist literature, I think the easy route would be to slip into cynicism. But there’s such an adoration of his own craft and the sensuous care of his own materiality that the work carries with it an inherent delicacy, a kind of grace wound into its very make-up, like a type of macabre but beautiful poetry in itself. 

   

I look forward to the day we can sit in a theatre, watching Murphy’s debut play upon stage, with the set-design that he’s created, all scored to music he wrote. It will be an atmospheric, theatrically sombre event, dimly lit, set to candle light. A bit of a Cabinet of Doctor Caligari vibe, I’m sure. So while the lights are on, spend some time with these works, consider the patience and care it would take to execute even just a small one. With those thin carefully delineated lines marking each individual strand of hair, or the articulated stigma of a flower, or the undulations of lace. Just as the Romantic finds himself lost in his own rapturous creation, these are marks that describe countless hours of obsession, and as this young career continues to evolve, one can only imagine how its varying facets will continue to intermingle into a further fully-realised beast. 

 

 

*A vanitas is a symbolic work of art showing the transience of life, the futility of pleasure, and the certainty of death, often contrasting symbols of wealth and symbols of ephemerality and death. Wikipedia

 

Lavish Entropy opens on Tuesday the 10th of July at Delphian Gallery – 67 York Street London W1H 1QB

More info HERE

Stitched Paper Drawing 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Another hand-stitched paper drawing that is going into the 75 Works On Paper show at Beers Contemporary.

The other artists include:

William Bradley | Jonathan Chapline | Jonni Cheatwood | Pat Cleveland | Miles Debas | Kim Dorland | James Drinkwater | Jonathan Edelhuber | Nick Flatt | Lenz Geerk | Ina Gerken | Robert Hardgrave | Aly Helyer | Damien Hoar de Galvan | Clinton Hayden | Gregory Hodge | Anna Ilsley | Thomas Iser | Joshua Jefferson | Daniel Jensen | Erik Jones | Jordy Kerwick | Sandro Kopp | William Lachance | Adam Lee | Dane Lovett | Leif Low Beer | Jessie Makinson | Kathryn Maple | Peter Matthews | Matt Maust | Laith McGregor | Holly Mills | Igor Moritz | Benjamin Murphy | Mark Mullin | Dominic Musa | Daniel Noonan | Dominic Myatt | Erik Olson | Danielle Orchard | Naudline Pierre | Mateusz Piestrak | Henrik Placht| Michael Reeder | Barry Reigate | Zach Reini |Nathan Ritterpusch | Giuliano Sale | Andrew Salgado | Mason Saltarelli | David Shillinglaw | Antonia Showering | Matthew David Smith | Pablo Tomek | Thom Trojanowski Hobson | Camille Walala | Taylor A White

A Rebours – Stitch Drawing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’ve recently started a new series of works that are drawn by hand stitching black thread into white paper. They are an absolute nightmare to do but I like the way the line is never properly curved, which is a similar way to the way a lot of my tape lines end up. 

 

This one is going in a group show at Beers Contemporary in November.

Copenhagen Kunstsalon Exhibition

Above is the work I will be showing in the Kunstsalon in Copenhagen next month, alongside an insane list of artists, including: Andrew Salgado, Jordy Kerwick, Kevin Perkins, Laurie Vincent, Jonathan Edelhuber, Sam Bassett, Spencer Shakespeare, Jenny Lundgren, Thom Trojanowski, Ellison Sean, AJ Katz, and loads more.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stitch Drawing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’m excited to show a little hint of a new style of work I’ve been working on, done by hand-stitching paper. I did a small one for the Art On A Postcard charity auction a few years ago, raising money for the Hepatitis C Trust. Here are a few sneak peeks of the first full-sized one, one is of the front and one is the reverse. 

 

For a works on paper show at the end of the year.

Terrence Higgins Trust auction at Christies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This week I have a work up for auction through Christies, raising money for the Terrence Higgins Trust.

Some of the other artists involved include: Tracey Emin, Howard Hodgkin, Mat Collishaw, Anthony Gormley, Anish Kapoor, Maggi Hambling, Billy Childish, Cornelia Parker, Julian Opie, Jeremy Deller, Michael Craig-Martin, Conrad Shawcross.

The work is a portrait commission, and is still available to bid on until 3pm on Thursday the 20th of April.

Bid on it [HERE]

 

Big thanks to Andrew Salgado and Beers Contemporary for getting me involved.

Benjamin Murphy